Business Law Section

Forsyth/Pose Scholarship

The Forsyth/Pose Scholarship is offered by the Business Law Section of the Law Council of Australia (BLS) for papers on a topic in the field of taxation law. It was offered for the first time in 2013 to commemorate leading taxation law practitioners Neil Forsyth QC and Kevin Pose. Both were long-standing members of the BLS specialist Taxation Committee.

Neil Forsyth QC was one of Australia’s foremost tax advisers from the 1980s until his untimely death in 1997. He was immensely learned, personally charming and incredibly generous to his colleagues. He was graced with a powerful intellect, strong work ethic, commitment to justice and a profound knowledge of all aspects of taxation and commercial law. Neil had an incisive sense of humour and not surprisingly he was one of the Bar’s most esteemed and liked members. He was a founding member of the BLS Taxation Committee.

Kevin Pose was a well established tax academic at University of Melbourne before reading with Neil Forsyth at the Bar. Kevin left the Bar to establish the tax team at Arthur Robinson and Hedderwicks (now Allens) and became one of Australia’s foremost tax practitioners and scholars. Kevin was one of the subscribers in support of the memorandum advocating the creation of the BLS and one of the founding members of the BLS Taxation Committee. He was gentle, honest, unassuming and diplomatic. The tax community suffered a sad loss with his untimely death in 2010.

This scholarship recognises that Neil and Kevin played a central role in developing and mentoring the careers of many young lawyers and were always concerned to ensure that they gave younger lawyers the opportunity to demonstrate and develop their talents.
 

Forsyth/Pose Scholarship 2019 round

Applications for the scholarship is now closed.
 

How to apply

Applications must be submitted on an official application form. Please submit applications to BLS Administrator, Jessica Morrow via email Jessica.Morrow@lawcouncil.asn.au or phone 02 6246 3737.
 

Previous winners

The 2018 Forsyth Pose Scholarship was awarded to Heydon Wardell-Burrus for his paper entitled, “Corporate Tax Residency: Clarity and Consequences”, which analyses the justification for the Commissioner's Taxation Ruling 2018/5 in response to Bywater Investments. He argued that the Commissioner's revised view arises from a misreading of both Bywater Investments and Malayan Shipping.

He argued that while the same activities can satisfy both the central management and control in Australia test and the carrying on business in Australia test, satisfying the former does not necessarily involve satisfying the latter. Heydon distinguishes his view from those adopted by other commentators on corporate tax residency including Professor Michael Dirkis and Robert Deutsch.

Heydon is a Senior Associate in the tax team at Allens, specialising in international tax and tax disputes. He is also a Chartered Tax Advisor, Co-Chair of the Tax Institute's Tax Disputes Program Committee and Chair of the NSW Young Lawyer's Taxation Committee. He has a BA (Hons) / LLB (Hons) from the University of Sydney where he is currently completing an LLM in tax. Heydon is a 2019 Fulbright Scholar and will study international tax and the recent United States tax reforms in the 2019/20 academic year.

Myles Bayliss was awarded the 2017 Forsyth Pose Scholarship for his paper ‘Universal Basic Income: The Potential Impact on the Australian Tax System’. Myles' paper focuses on the UBI welfare policy in the Australian tax law context. In particular the paper examines whether a UBI policy would be considered constitutional and how the introduction of a UBI in Australia could impact the tax system and law. Drawing on the analysis of the High Court in Pape v Commissioner of Taxation, Myles argues that a UBI would be within the scope of powers granted by the Constitution. He posits that the introduction of a UBI could also affect positive change on the tax system by necessitating tax reform resulting in a less complex and more effective tax system.

Peter Scott was awarded the 2016 Forsyth Pose Scholarship for his paper ‘Insecure Creditors and the Commissioner of Taxation: the Crown Priority Zombie’. Drawing on his experience working on insolvency related tax issues at Arnold Bloch Leibler, Peter’s paper examines the extent to which the purported removal of Crown priority in the 1980s and early 1990s has been successful. He argues that the Commissioner of Taxation remains in a very privileged position vis-à-vis other creditors in the context of insolvent companies, and is often able to assert effective priority over both secured and unsecured creditors. In this context, Peter concludes that both secured and unsecured creditors might more aptly be described as ‘insecure creditors’.

Joel Emery was awarded the 2015 Forsyth Pose Scholarship for his paper 'Decoding the Regulatory Enigma: How Australian Regulators should Respond to the Tax Challenges Presented by Bitcoin'. Drawing on international experience, this paper examines the two major tax challenges presented by Bitcoin and similar digital currencies: ascertaining how they should be treated by Australian tax law, and designing a system for their effective regulation. The paper argues that not only is treating Bitcoin as money a defensible interpretation of the current law, but, more importantly, a regulatory approach that fosters the development of digital currency businesses, which act as intermediaries to digital currency transactions, may provide an effective solution to the long-term regulations of such technologies.

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